Sacrosanct Blood

Sacrosanct Blood

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Sacrosanct Blood

“Sacrosanct Blood” is paranormal history for lovers of dark genres. But it is also real history, deliciously mixed with fantasy. The book is in the gothic genre, though in a rather different and surprising way. It sweeps readers back to the doomed world of the Romanovs and conjures those turbulent days in a dark story with intrigue, excess and conspiracy, in which historical facts are given from the perspective of the fantastical. “Sacrosanct Blood” is also an alternative account of a notorious crime – that of the murder of Rasputin – as well as the terrible deed’s consequences. This is a book for everybody, in the spirit of “The Historian” by Elizabeth Kostova, or “The Vampire” by Tom Holland.

In December 1916, as WWI ravages Europe, the city of Saint Petersburg has been patriotically renamed Petrograd, so as not to sound too German. Prince Felix Yusupov is on a clandestine mission. There is a conspiracy to remove the Siberian peasant Grigory Rasputin from the court of the tsar. Its members include people of high social status, as well as secret foreign agents operating in Petrograd.

Things are more sinister and complicated than some suspect. It seems vampirism is spreading among the aristocratic families of the city. The strange and abnormal trait becomes apparent in times of decadence and danger. Prince Felix Yusupov has been transformed into a bloodthirsty one. Felix’s task, as a member of the murderous conspiracy, which includes both vampires and non-vampires, is to learn whether Rasputin acts in favour of the enemy. The prince, however, becomes secretly and perversely attracted to the extraordinary Rasputin.

At the Grand Duchess Militsa Romanova’s house, vampires, as well as informed non-vampires, conduct a séance. They “receive” certain knowledge: Rasputin must not be touched. However, not all are convinced. Some still want the peasant removed, despite the dire warnings of the existence of a special kind of blood. Blood that is feared by vampires and is described as “sacrosanct”. The Siberian peasant could very well be such a blood-carrier.